St Margaret Clitherow

RC Primary School, Stevenage

Jesus is our guide, let us follow Him

Our Learning / Art

Art at St. Margaret Clitherow

At St. Margaret Clitherow School we aim to provide our pupils with opportunities to express their individual thoughts, ideas and interests whilst developing their artistic skills, taking inspiration from a range of artists and a variety of cultures.

How is our curriculum delivered?

The children enjoy an art lesson once a week during three half-terms a year, on rotation with their design and technology learning. This ensures our children have the time and space to study each topic in depth over a half-term.  
The art scheme is designed with five strands that run throughout:

Units of lessons are sequential, allowing children to build their skills and knowledge, applying them to a range of outcomes. The formal elements, a key part of the national curriculum, are also woven throughout the units. Key skills are visited again and again with increasing complexity in a spiral curriculum model. This allows pupils to revise and build on their previous learning. Units in each year group are organised into four core areas:

Drawing
Exploring mark-making in all its forms, experimenting with line, tone and texture and using a wide range of materials to express ideas as drawings. Using sketchbooks to record observations about the world as drawings. Learning how drawing is used by artists to develop and communicate their ideas creatively.

Painting and mixed-media
Developing proficiency in painting techniques (including exploring colour mixing), painting on a range of surfaces and applying drawing skills to painting projects. Using sketchbooks to practise painting methods and exploring the interplay between different media within a piece of artwork.

Sculptures and 3D
Constructing and creating models with a wide variety of materials, investigating ways to express ideas in three dimensions. Developing the ability to adapt ideas and designs in sketchbooks, moving from two dimensions into sculpture.

Craft and design
Producing a wide range of creative work, becoming proficient in a range of making processes. Building on skills in photography, printmaking, textile art and digital media, and exploring design disciplines such as architecture and product design. Creativity and independent outcomes are robustly embedded into our units, supporting pupils in learning how to make their own creative choices and decisions, so that their art outcomes, whilst still being knowledge rich, are unique to the students. Lessons are always practical in nature and encourage experimental and exploratory learning. Teachers differentiate their lessons to ensure that lessons can be accessed and enjoyed by all pupils and opportunities to stretch pupils’ learning are available when required. As well as our timetabled lessons, KS2children also have the opportunity to join a lunchtime art club run by members of the Youth Leadership Team and an after-school art club run by an outside provider, 'My After School Art Club.'
Please follow the link to see some of the projects the children have been working on:
www.myafterschoolartclub.com/saturday-hitchin-gallery

We aim to ensure our children leave us with a range of techniques and the confidence and creativity to form a strong foundation for their art and design learning in KS3 and beyond. We aim to ensure our children will:

How can I help at home?

1.   Talk about art  -  One of the best ways to get your child excited about art is to be enthusiastic yourself.

2.   Provide materials  -  Encourage your child's interest in art by providing materials and a place to create art. Crayons, modelling clay, scraps of wool and fabric, different kinds of paper and found objects such as shells, twigs, buttons can be used to help your children make their own art. Provide a special place to work, such as an old table, and a drawer or shelf to store the materials.

3.   Encourage creativity  -  Help your child come up with original ideas and build upon them. You might do this by reading only the beginning of a story, then asking your child to draw a picture showing how the story might end. Or make a squiggle on a piece of paper and ask your child to use it as the beginning of a drawing.